1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 16L 16T 16ab 16s 17 18 19 20a 20b 21 22 23 24 24a1 24a2 25 26 27 28 29 30 30a 31 32 32y 33 34 g1-5 g6-7 g8-12 g13-16 g17-19 j1-2 j3-4
Ellora Cave Temples

floor 1




floor 2



Cave 15
steps leading to the main cave

968 (_CAV2453.jpg)


1042 (_CAV2454.jpg)
1 of 4>>Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

1043 (_CAV2455.jpg)
Nandi mandapa - wall detail

902 (_CAV2456.jpg)
1 of 2>>Nandi mandapa - detail

903 (_CAV2457.jpg)
1 of 2>>Nandi mandapa

view from the left, facing the main cave

904 (_CAV2458.jpg)
1 of 2>>Nandi mandapa - wall detail

905 (_CAV2459.jpg)
1 of 3>>Nandi mandapa - wall detail

906 (_CAV2460.jpg)
Nandi mandapa - wall detail

907 (_CAV2461.jpg)
Nandi mandapa -jali window

908 (_CAV2462.jpg)
Nandi mandapa

969 (_CAV2463.jpg)
1 of 3>>Facade Das Avatara Cave

Cave 15, started toward the very end of late Buddhist phase of work at Ellora, was interrupted in mid-course by the Rastrakuta Dantidurga's conquest of the region in about 750 A.D or (more probably) just before. Also called the Das Avatara--referring to the ten manifestation of Vishnu, a few of which are indeed shown in the cave, is in fact a Saiva dedication, attested by the presence of lingam shrine. However, its vast pillared plan, so akin to those of the late Buddhist Caves 11 and 12, to say nothing of its placement close to them (separated only by the earlier Caves 13 and 14) recommend the theory that it was in fact started as a late Buddhist vihara. What seems to confirm this view is the presence of small images of seated Buddhas on the front pillar capitals of the upper floor, together with figures of seated female figures, presumably Taras, on the two pilaster capitals.

970 (_CAV2464.jpg)
<<2 of 3>>Facade Das Avatara Cave

Cave 15, started toward the very end of late Buddhist phase of work at Ellora, was interrupted in mid-course by the Rastrakuta Dantidurga's conquest of the region in about 750 A.D or (more probably) just before. Also called the Das Avatara--referring to the ten manifestation of Vishnu, a few of which are indeed shown in the cave, is in fact a Saiva dedication, attested by the presence of lingam shrine. However, its vast pillared plan, so akin to those of the late Buddhist Caves 11 and 12, to say nothing of its placement close to them (separated only by the earlier Caves 13 and 14) recommend the theory that it was in fact started as a late Buddhist vihara. What seems to confirm this view is the presence of small images of seated Buddhas on the front pillar capitals of the upper floor, together with figures of seated female figures, presumably Taras, on the two pilaster capitals.

1044 (_CAV2465.jpg)
<<3 of 3Facade Das Avatara Cave

Cave 15, started toward the very end of late Buddhist phase of work at Ellora, was interrupted in mid-course by the Rastrakuta Dantidurga's conquest of the region in about 750 A.D or (more probably) just before. Also called the Das Avatara--referring to the ten manifestation of Vishnu, a few of which are indeed shown in the cave, is in fact a Saiva dedication, attested by the presence of lingam shrine. However, its vast pillared plan, so akin to those of the late Buddhist Caves 11 and 12, to say nothing of its placement close to them (separated only by the earlier Caves 13 and 14) recommend the theory that it was in fact started as a late Buddhist vihara. What seems to confirm this view is the presence of small images of seated Buddhas on the front pillar capitals of the upper floor, together with figures of seated female figures, presumably Taras, on the two pilaster capitals.

971 (_CAV2466.jpg)
Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

909 (_CAV2467.jpg)
cistern chamber

At the right (south) of the court, there is a large cistern chamber, and an upper chamber gained by a flight of steps. Another large plain chamber (now locked and used for storage) is cut in the left (north) court wall. It contains six cells, two each at left, right, and rear, but since they are still somewhat unfinished, their intended purpose is not clear; however we can assume, because of the disposition of the rear cells, that no shrine was intended.

910 (_CAV2468.jpg)
Nandi mandapa - jali window

911 (_CAV2469.jpg)
1 of 2>>Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

912 (_CAV2470.jpg)
Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

913 (_CAV2471.jpg)
later intrusive carvaing

914 (_CAV2472.jpg)


915 (_CAV2473.jpg)


916 (_CAV2474.jpg)


917 (_CAV2475.jpg)
1 of 2>>

918 (_CAV2476.jpg)


919 (_CAV2477.jpg)
<<2 of 2

920 (_CAV2478.jpg)


1045 (_CAV2479.jpg)


1046 (_CAV2480.jpg)


1047 (_CAV2481.jpg)
1 of 2>>

1048 (_CAV2482.jpg)
1 of 2>>

972 (_CAV2483.jpg)


973 (_CAV2484.jpg)
Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

921 (_CAV2486.jpg)


1029 (_CAV2582.jpg)


1090 (_CAV2592.jpg)
Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

1037 (_CAV2608.jpg)
Nandi mandapa

view from the cave - showing entrance to the mandapa

923 (_CAV2614.jpg)
1 of 2>>Nandi mandapa - wall detail

924 (_CAV2615.jpg)
1 of 2>>Nandi mandapa - wall detail

925 (_CAV2616.jpg)
Nandi mandapa

926 (_CAV2617.jpg)
1 of 3>>Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

927 (_CAV2618.jpg)
<<2 of 3>>Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

928 (_CAV2619.jpg)
1 of 2>>Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

929 (_CAV2620.jpg)
Namdi mandapa - wall detail

930 (_CAV2621.jpg)
1 of 2>>Namdi mandapa - wall detail

931 (_CAV2622.jpg)
Namdi mandapa - wall detail

Right wall (facing the main cave)

932 (_CAV2623.jpg)
<<2 of 4>>Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

933 (_CAV2624.jpg)
main cave entranceway

stairs with elephants and chandrashila

934 (_CAV2625.jpg)
main cave entranceway

stairs with elephants and chandrashila

935 (_CAV2626.jpg)
1 of 2>>

936 (_CAV2627.jpg)
1 of 2>>

937 (_CAV2628.jpg)
1 of 2>>

938 (_CAV2629.jpg)
1 of 2>>

939 (_CAV2630.jpg)


940 (_CAV2631.jpg)


941 (_CAV2632.jpg)
1 of 3>>

943 (_CAV2634.jpg)


944 (_CAV2635.jpg)


945 (_CAV2636.jpg)
1 of 13>>

946 (_CAV2637.jpg)
<<2 of 13>>

947 (_CAV2638.jpg)
<<2 of 3>>

948 (_CAV2639.jpg)
<<3 of 3

949 (_CAV2640.jpg)
<<3 of 13>>

950 (_CAV2641.jpg)
<<4 of 13>>

951 (_CAV2642.jpg)
<<5 of 13>>

952 (_CAV2643.jpg)
<<6 of 13>>

953 (_CAV2644.jpg)
<<7 of 13>>

954 (_CAV2645.jpg)
<<8 of 13>>

955 (_CAV2646.jpg)
<<9 of 13>>

956 (_CAV2647.jpg)
<<10 of 13>>

958 (_CAV2649.jpg)
steps leading to the cave (looking out from the cave)

960 (_CAV2651.jpg)
steps leading to the cave (looking out from the cave)

961 (_CAV2652.jpg)
small shrine

small shrine to the left of the steps leading to the cave

962 (_CAV2653.jpg)
small shrine

small shrine to the left of the steps leading to the cave

963 (_CAV2654.jpg)


964 (_CAV2655.jpg)


965 (_CAV2656.jpg)


966 (_CAV2657.jpg)


6211 (_ELO6016.JPG)


6206 (_ELO6204.JPG)


6207 (_ELO6205.JPG)


6208 (_ELO6207.JPG)


6209 (_ELO6210.JPG)


6210 (_ELO6211.JPG)


4541 (c15_1floor_Wr1.jpg)


4540 (c15_1floor.jpg)


4542 (c15_1floorentrance.jpg)


4547 (c15_cellsreW.jpg)


4548 (c15_cellsreW1.jpg)
<<11 of 13>>

4549 (c15_dS1.jpg)
<<12 of 13>>

4550 (c15_dS1a.jpg)


4551 (c15_lcellstairway-durga.jpg)


4552 (c15_lcellstairway.jpg)


4553 (c15_lp.jpg)


4554 (c15_lstairscells.jpg)


4555 (c15_lstairscells1.jpg)


4556 (c15_mainentrance.jpg)


4557 (c15_mainentrance1.jpg)


4558 (c15_rp.jpg)
<<2 of 2Panchagni Tapsya

To the left of the court's lowest level, there is a damaged shrine with a polished lingam in a late-type circular pitha, the shrine doorway being guarded by Saiva dvarapalas with characteristic clubs and assertive poses. On the left wall is standing Parvati enduring the "five fires" (seen here); two (only) are shown below. She has the ascetic's headdress, rosary, and water jar.

4559 (c15_S1-1.jpg)
<<2 of 2Visnu and Brahma

To the left of the court's lowest level, there is a damaged shrine with a polished lingam in a late-type circular pitha, the shrine doorway being guarded by Saiva dvarapalas with characteristic clubs and assertive poses. On the left wall is standing Parvati enduring the "five fires" Just to the right stand Vishnu with lotus and cakra above; the personified (female) mace (gada) stands below at the left, the personifed (male) conch at the right. Next, to the right, stands Brahma, with three (of four) heads and with rosary and water pot, holding lotuses in his upper hands; the scraggly birds below must be his hamsas. Channels to drain off ablutions are cut in front of each figure.

4560 (c15_S1-2.jpg)
<<2 of 2Smaller shrine on the left of main court

To the left of the court's lowest level, there is a damaged shrine with a polished lingam in a late-type circular pitha, the shrine doorway being guarded by Saiva dvarapalas with characteristic clubs and assertive poses.

4561 (c15_S1-3-6.jpg)
Small shrine to the left of the main court

To the left of the court's lowest level, there is a damaged shrine with a polished lingam in a late-type circular pitha, the shrine doorway being guarded by Saiva dvarapalas with characteristic clubs and assertive poses.

4562 (c15_S1-4-5.jpg)
<<2 of 2Ganesa

To the left of the court's lowest level, there is a damaged shrine with a polished lingam in a late-type circular pitha, the shrine doorway being guarded by Saiva dvarapalas with characteristic clubs and assertive poses. On the left wall is a standing Parvati enduring the "five fires" (seen here); two (only) are shown below. She has the ascetic's headdress, rosary, and water jar. Just to the right stand Vishnu with lotus and cakra above; the personified (female) mace (gada) stands below at the left, the personifed (male) conch at the right. Next, to the right, stands Brahma, with three (of four) heads and with rosary and water pot, holding lotuses in his upper hands; the scraggly birds below must be his hamsas. The other wall shows traces of a Ganesa, the head and trunk alone being vaguely visible.

4563 (c15_S1-7.jpg)


4564 (c15_S1.jpg)
<<13 of 13

4565 (c15_S1lingam.jpg)


4566 (c15_S2-11.jpg)
<<2 of 2

4567 (c15_S2-11a.jpg)


4568 (c15_S2-11cornerd.jpg)


4569 (c15_S2-11w.jpg)


4570 (c15_S2-12.jpg)
<<2 of 3>>

4571 (c15_S2-12a.jpg)


4572 (c15_S2-12w.jpg)


4573 (c15_S2-13.jpg)
<<2 of 2

4574 (c15_S2-d10.jpg)
<<2 of 2

4575 (c15_S2-d10a.jpg)
<<2 of 2

4577 (c15_S2-d11b.jpg)


4578 (c15_S2-d11c.jpg)
<<3 of 3

4579 (c15_S2-d12.jpg)
<<2 of 2

4580 (c15_S2-d12a.jpg)


4581 (c15_S2-d13.jpg)


4582 (c15_S2-d13a.jpg)
<<2 of 2

4583 (c15_S2-d13b.jpg)
<<3 of 4>>Nandi mandapa (rear view)

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

4584 (c15_S2.jpg)
Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

4585 (c15_S2a.jpg)
<<4 of 4Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

4587 (c15_S2blindporch.jpg)
<<2 of 2Nandi mandapa

4588 (c15_S2blindporchld.jpg)

Warning: getimagesize(http://media.elloracaves.org/images/caves_360px/c15_S2D_same.jpg): failed to open stream: HTTP request failed! HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found in /home/binarybottle/elloracaves.org/caves.php on line 149

Warning: Division by zero in /home/binarybottle/elloracaves.org/caves.php on line 153
<<3 of 3Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

4591 (c15_S2D_same.jpg)
Nandi mandapa

This monolithic courtyard

4592 (c15_S2dD.jpg)
<<2 of 2Nandi mandapa

Sometimes called a Dancing Hall, this monolithic structure may have been a shrine for the devoted bull Nandi. Despite its necessarily low placement, this shrine was associated with the lingam in the upper floor. However, it had to be cut at its present low level because the earlier Buddhist excavators had already removed some or most of the matrix from the area above its roof. It is likely that the handsome loose image of Siva's bull that sits on the floor of the upper pillared hall on axis with the lingam, was once placed upon the roof of this courtyard edifice, in order to allow it better to attend the lingam within the cave. This would explain the anomalously flat treatment of the roof, with its low central platform, probably originally for the Nandi iself.

4593 (c15_S2e.jpg)


4594 (c15_S2lcornerd.jpg)


4597 (c15_stairs.jpg)


4598 (c15_stairs1.jpg)
<<2 of 2

4599 (c15_stairwell.jpg)
<<2 of 2

4600 (c15_stairwell1.jpg)


4601 (c15_stairwell2.jpg)


4602 (c15_stairwell3.jpg)


4603 (c15_stairwell4.jpg)

Warning: getimagesize(http://media.elloracaves.org/images/caves_360px/c15_tourists.jpg): failed to open stream: HTTP request failed! HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found in /home/binarybottle/elloracaves.org/caves.php on line 149

Warning: Division by zero in /home/binarybottle/elloracaves.org/caves.php on line 153


4604 (c15_tourists.jpg)


4539 (c151Floor_Wr.jpg)
1 of 3>>Facade Das Avatara cave

Cave 15, started toward the very end of late Buddhist phase of work at Ellora, was interrupted in mid-course by the Rastrakuta Dantidurga's conquest of the region in about 750 A.D or (more probably) just before. Also called the Das Avatara--referring to the ten manifestation of Vishnu, a few of which are indeed shown in the cave, is in fact a Saiva dedication, attested by the presence of lingam shrine. However, its vast pillared plan, so akin to those of the late Buddhist Caves 11 and 12, to say nothing of its placement close to them (separated only by the earlier Caves 13 and 14) recommend the theory that it was in fact started as a late Buddhist vihara. What seems to confirm this view is the presence of small images of seated Buddhas on the front pillar capitals of the upper floor, together with figures of seated female figures, presumably Taras, on the two pilaster capitals.

4605 (c15F.jpg)
<<2 of 3>>Facade Das Avatara cave

Cave 15, started toward the very end of late Buddhist phase of work at Ellora, was interrupted in mid-course by the Rastrakuta Dantidurga's conquest of the region in about 750 A.D or (more probably) just before. Also called the Das Avatara--referring to the ten manifestation of Vishnu, a few of which are indeed shown in the cave, is in fact a Saiva dedication, attested by the presence of lingam shrine. However, its vast pillared plan, so akin to those of the late Buddhist Caves 11 and 12, to say nothing of its placement close to them (separated only by the earlier Caves 13 and 14) recommend the theory that it was in fact started as a late Buddhist vihara. What seems to confirm this view is the presence of small images of seated Buddhas on the front pillar capitals of the upper floor, together with figures of seated female figures, presumably Taras, on the two pilaster capitals.

4606 (c15F1.jpg)
<<3 of 3Facade Das Avatara cave

Cave 15, started toward the very end of late Buddhist phase of work at Ellora, was interrupted in mid-course by the Rastrakuta Dantidurga's conquest of the region in about 750 A.D or (more probably) just before. Also called the Das Avatara--referring to the ten manifestation of Vishnu, a few of which are indeed shown in the cave, is in fact a Saiva dedication, attested by the presence of lingam shrine. However, its vast pillared plan, so akin to those of the late Buddhist Caves 11 and 12, to say nothing of its placement close to them (separated only by the earlier Caves 13 and 14) recommend the theory that it was in fact started as a late Buddhist vihara. What seems to confirm this view is the presence of small images of seated Buddhas on the front pillar capitals of the upper floor, together with figures of seated female figures, presumably Taras, on the two pilaster capitals.

4607 (c15Fc.jpg)


4608 (DSCN5005.jpg)

143 results in Cave 15: